COPYCAT REALITY

Cinefex: Westworld and VR The Cinefex article on Westworld was compelling because of the relationship it depicted between technical prowess and practical effects that served to convince viewers of a reality. Jay Worth, a VFX contributor to Nolan’s series, elaborated on how they aimed for hyper realism in every detail of CG, from the way …

VR AND CHILDREN’S MEDIA

You’ve probably heard of the children’s story Harold and the Purple Crayon. It tells the endearing story of a four-year old boy who uses his purple crayon to draw his own world to explore. Sounds a lot like Oculus’ Quill or Google’s Tilt Brush. We can be modern-day Harolds and create our own worlds with …

VR’s Evolved Relationship to Media

  Rheingold: VR and Media Rheingold discusses a surprising relationship between VR (and emerging technologies in general) and the media (pp 34-35). As consumers, we relate to emerging technologies in a very specific manner — through media oriented around anticipation. Rheingold raises an often neglected point that the producers of these technologies had a problematic …

A HISTORY OF VIRTUAL REALITY

The first reference to virtual reality was in Stanley G. Weinbaum’s 1935 sci-fi short story “Pygmalion’s Spectacles”, which you can read more about here. From then on, VR went down in history as we know it today. A Timeline of VR’s History 1833: Sir Charles Wheatstone invented the stereoscope, which was improved by Sir David Brewster. 1928: …

CHRIS MILK: VR PIONEER

Chris Milk: The VRenaissance Man Everyone should know who this guy is. He has spearheaded the VR movement in extremely creative ways, ranging from art installations to moving short films that have influenced policy change in war-torn countries. He is an entrepreneur, innovator, director, photographer, and immersive artist. Essentially, he’s a modern renaissance man. He started …

The Search for Disembodied Experiences

We have access to so many different kinds of experience that the thought of not having access to something can be disturbing. Just think about the things we’ll never be able to do (there’s something about the finality of ‘never’ that rubs everyone the wrong way). You’ll never know what it’s like to be in …